Archive | Wellness

Path to Heart Coherence

The Path to Heart/Mind Coherence

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Welcome to Wednesday Wisdom. In my video I will share a very special pressure point to help you visual-eyes. I will also be sharing Step One of The Path to Heart Coherence…bringing mind and body together, because your body can’t reach its highest potential and your mind won’t find peace without it.

Enjoy My Wednesday Wisdom Video – The Path to Heart Coherence


Choose Your Life

You Have the Ability to Choose Your Life…

and Create Your Own Reality

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What you see is what you … forget? What happens when you look, and what happens when you see? It’s all about focus, where is yours?

Choose the way you live your life with today’s…

Friday Live Video


Wholeness and Calm

Can Wholeness and Calm be Achieved Over the Holidays or Any Day?

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Whether it’s during the holidays or any other day, wholeness and calm can be achieved by changing our brain waves…Learn how you can do that  as you watch my

Friday Live Video


Integrated Body

Friday Live – What is an Integrated Body? Is Yours?

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Is your body integrated?  What does that really mean? How can you feel great, look amazing and live your phenomenal life? You’ll discover how when you…

Enjoy my Friday Live Video!


Adrendal Fatigue

Could You Have Adrenal Fatigue?

Fatigue-BODYWISEBodyworkThis is part of a series of informational videos that I call Facebook Friday Live.

Today I’m going to be talking about Adrenal Fatigue, which is considered a syndrome because it is a collection of symptoms and signs that indicate that your adrenal glands are not functioning at their optimum. Today I will be discussing some of the symptoms, and sharing with you what I do that helps me.

Please enjoy my Adrenal Fatigue video, I hope it’s helpful.

 

Little Boat, Big Fear

I learned quite a bit about my own big fear after spending 3 hours at an event yesterday called Row For A Day (RFAD). This, in preparation for the month long Learn To Row I signed up for at the Sammamish Rowing Club which starts June 7.

After registration, there was a brief introduction to Rowing terms and parts of the boat. We practiced the Rowing motion on erg machines and went down to the dock.

I lowered myself in an 8 person shell with 4 other novice Rowers. I was shown how to keep my single oar snug to the lock, told Never let go of it under any circumstance, and how to use it to keep the boat balanced. As we pushed off, I noticed the shell wasn’t really that much wider than my hips.

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The winds were high. The water was choppy. The bow rowers were having trouble getting us out of the sleugh and onto the lake. I was seat 7, one of the stern pair. For obvious reasons (that I hadn’t clearly understood before), rowers always work in pairs. Because I was paired with an experienced rower and the boat needed more power to prevent it from being blown into the shore, we were called by the coxswain to row.

Not realizing it, I had been preparing myself for this moment. Rowing is, in actuality, a pushing sport – the leg push is the motion that gives a stroke its power. I had been lifting heavy weights in virtually the same way, by pushing my legs really hard. In a boat, all I needed to do was push against the foot plate in the same way I pushed against the floor to lift weight.

Number 8, the rower with his back to me, set the pace. All I had to do was follow, but of course, pushing is not the only movement to master – the water has a way with one’s oar. 1. Left in too long, the oar continues to push its smooth end directly into your ribs (and could potentially break them). I felt the beginnings of several rib-crusher strokes and I quickly learned to avoid them. 2. An oar with too little depth wastes the strong stroke from the legs and throws off your timing, not to mention how it completely off-balances the boat and steers it off course.

Oddly enough, during this whole experience I didn’t feel any gut-wrenching, forehead-sweating fear. Instead, I realized the importance of many transfer-to-life things like

A. Focus on the current stroke – one can’t worry about the last one because you end up with two bad strokes in a row. Or worse, a stack of poor strokes.

Forgive the mistake, learn from it, and focus on now.

B. The boat needs you – you must row when you are needed to row. You can not stop to catch your breath or take a rest. When the coxswain calls you to action, you must take action because the boat will not move forward without all rowers rowing.

Every seat has a role and is necessary. Life is a simplified form of rowing.

You an important contributor – will you be ready when you are called?

I choose to be afraid

I’ve been studying fear lately. Fear can be paralyzing or it can be motivating… Too often, I choose the former and give in to the fear – unaware of its power or its source. There is a book entitled “The Gift of Fear” which describes how fear is a tool we can leverage. Oddly enough, I’ve been afraid to read it.

What’s the best way to use fear to move ahead? Here are two suggestions:
1. Be aware. Notice when you feel it, pay attention to what triggers it.
2. Make a choice. Realize that fear doesn’t have to dictate your actions.

Oar_in_water

I’ve been doing specific things to prepare myself. Workouts have had a singular focus. Thoughts have been unwavering.

Tomorrow is my big fear debut: I start Rowing. In a boat. In deep deep water. Without a life jacket.

My desire to learn to Row is greater than my fear of water. I’ll carefully step into a rocking boat tomorrow wondering if that intense, gut wrenching fear of water will ever really go away. I do know, however, that my longing to Row will propel me onward, to become greater than the fear that grips me.

Find your fear. Let it be a source of growth for you, too.

If you need help moving past a fear, try moving your body with a BODYWISE workshop or one on one programs. It will change you for the better.

I saw a man dying today…

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I was pushing myself to do something that was scary to me.

I have been wanting to learn to row for quite a few years and up until now, the kids were too young for me to be gone in the early mornings. In order to row, its required to take a float test to ensure one doesn’t drown if the boat capsizes.

I’ve had near drowning accidents as a child and while I love being in the water, I’m also afraid and never really learned to swim. I was nervous and on my way to the pool when I saw the squad cars.

As I drove past, the officers were shaking the arm of a man collapsed on the sidewalk. I saw his ashen face, closed eyes, pain etched into his laugh lines. He was alone and dying and the policemen ripped open his shirt to use an AED.

I was afraid to take a float test – and I’m still alive to tell.

Life is too short. Live it well. Be grateful. Love the people around you.

We need to move to live.

Please, please, move more.