Archive | July, 2015

Sit up or sit down

 

IMG_9208.JPGBodies conform to the shapes of the chairs we sit in: What does your chair ‘say’ about you?
If that chair is overstuffed and cradling your body, you may use very little (to no) muscle to hold yourself.

If it has a straight-back, your neck muscles can probably hold your head comfortably over the upright stacked spine – if it’s curved, the muscles on the front of your neck work overtime to support the head.

In a higher chair, it does not require much leg strength to lower yourself down.  If its low to the ground, it takes a lot of muscle to get there (or you just may avoid that chair altogether if it’s too difficult for you!)

Pay attention to where you sit.  Notice how long you sit.  Vary the objects you choose to sit in, from bar stools to Big Boys to… the floor!  If you can get up from the floor, and do it multiple times a day, you’ll live longer!!

If you do need to sit and the floor is not an option, I recommend sitting in a hard straight chair:

1.  You won’t sit too long in it,

2. You’ll have good support against which to stand up from, and

3. You’re likely to get in and out of it more often – a good leg strengthening exercise which will give you good moves and keep you body wise…
#MoveEveryday, #MoveMoreAgeLess, #BodyWise, #AlignYourFeet, #PosturePerfect, #CreateYourLife, #BetterMovement, #GoodMovesGreatLife

Change Your Chair

IMG_9127.JPGMost chairs are a similar height so the difference in the vertical change we make (from standing to sitting) on a daily basis varies little.  Obviously, a taller person has to lower themselves further to sit in a chair than one of shorter stature.

The important point is how often one *varies* the vertical distance traveled. The body habituates itself so well, that it learns and remembers how far away a chair is… And the musculature necessary to accomplish the task quickly adjusts to only whats needed (and little more).

Given enough time and limited movement, even the same chair can become difficult for someone to get into, or get out of.  We’ve all witnessed the elderly struggling to sit and stand…  Truth:  If we don’t use muscle, we lose muscle.

How do you know if you’re headed down the path to losing muscle?  A few clues are sure indicators

1. Using your hands and arms to lift yourself out of a chair

2. Difficulty getting fully straight and upright after sitting.

3. Inability to lower yourself all the eay down into the seat of a chair (*crashing* down the last 1″ or more).

Keep your muscles guessing – and strong – by changing what you sit on as well as where you sit!  Try standing  up more often throughout the day, too.

 

Summer immunity boost 

IMG_9053.JPGThe unusual Seattle summer heat is a great opportunity to improve immunity, increase circulation, and have fun while doing it!  Hydrotherapy is the process of changing body temperature using water as a medium. All you need is a garden hose (the pool is optional).
We purchased an inexpensive 3 foot deep pool and the kids have been in and out of it multiple times a day!
Moving back and forth from the cold pool water to the hot air has put them both into an intense immune response: Sniffles, coughing, and sneezing! This is a great way to prepare them for the new school year…
Want to try it yourself? If you’re not into dousing with the cold water from the outdoor hose, no problem. Just turn on the cool water at the end of your shower…
Happy immunity!!